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Motivation

The Struggle

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The Struggle

A man found a cocoon of a butterfly. One day a small opening appeared. He sat and watched the butterfly for several hours as it struggled to force its body through that little hole. Then it seemed to stop making any progress. It appeared as if it had gotten as far as it could, and it could go no further.
So the man decided to help the butterfly. He took a pair of scissors and snipped off the remaining bit of the cocoon. The butterfly then emerged easily. But it had a swollen body and small, shriveled wings. The man continued to watch the butterfly because he expected that, at any moment, the wings would enlarge and expand to be able to support the body, which would contract in time. Neither happened! In fact, the butterfly spent the rest of its life crawling around with a swollen body and shriveled wings. It never was able to fly.
What the man, in his kindness and haste, did not understand was that the restricting cocoon and the struggle required for the butterfly to get through the tiny opening were God’s way of forcing fluid from the body of the butterfly into its wings so that it would be ready for flight once it achieved its freedom from the cocoon.
Sometimes struggles are exactly what we need in our lives. If God allowed us to go through our lives without any obstacles, it would cripple us.
We would not be as strong as what we could have been. We could never fly!

I asked for Strength……… And God gave me Difficulties to make me strong.
I asked for Wisdom…… I asked for Prosperity….. And God gave me Brain and Brawn to work.
I asked for Courage……… And God gave me Danger to overcome.
I asked for Love……… And God gave me Troubled people to help.
I asked for Favors……… And God gave me Opportunities.
I received nothing I wanted …….. I received everything I needed!

Attitude

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ATTITUDE

THE LONGER I LIVE, THE MORE I REALIZE THE IMPACT OF ATTITUDE ON LIFE. ATTITUDE, TO ME IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE FACTS. IT IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN PAST, THAN EDUCATION, THAN SUCCESS, THAN WHAT OTHER PEOPLE THINK OR SAY OR DO. IT IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN APPEARANCE, GIFTEDNESS OR SKILL. IT WILL MAKE OR BREAK A COMPANY … A TEAM…a FAMILY…A HOME. THE REMARKABLE THINK IS YOU HAVE A CHOICE EVERYDAY REGARDING THE ATTITUDE YOU WILL EMBRACE FOR THAT DAY. WE CANNOT CHANGE OUR PAST… WE CANNOT CHANGE THE FACT THAT PEOPLE WILL ACT IN A CERTAIN WAY. WE CANNOT CHANGE THE INEVITABLE… THE ONLY THING WE CAN DO IS PLAY ON THE ONE STRING WE HAVE, AND THAT IS OUR ATTITUDE. I AM CONVINCED THAT IT’S 10% WHAT HAPPENS TO ME AND 90% HOW I REACT TO IT. AND SO IT IS WITH YOU… “YOU” ARE IN CHARGE OF YOUR ATTITUDES.

I’ve Two Choices

Jerry was the kind of guy you love to hate. He was always in a good mood and
always had something positive to say. When someone would ask him how he was
doing, he would reply, “If I were any better, I would be twins!” He was a
unique manager because he had several waiters who had followed him around
from restaurant to restaurant. The reason the waiters followed Jerry was
because of his attitude. He was a natural
motivator. If an employee was having a bad day, Jerry was there telling the
employee how to look on the positive side of the situation. Seeing this
style really made me curious, so one day I went up to Jerry and asked him,
“I don’t get it! You can’t be a positive person all of the time. How do you
do it?”
Jerry replied, “Each morning I wake up and say to myself, Jerry, you have
two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to
be in a bad mood.” I choose to be in a good mood. Each time something bad
happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it. I
choose to learn from it. Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can
choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of
life. I choose the positive side of life.”
“Yeah, right, it’s not that easy,” I protested.
“Yes it is,” Jerry said, “Life is all about choices. When you cut away all
the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to
situations. You choose how people will affect your mood. You choose to be in
a good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It’s your choice how you live
life.”
I reflected on what Jerry said. Soon thereafter, I left the restaurant
industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but often thought about
him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it.
Several years later, I heard that Jerry did something you are never supposed
to do in a restaurant business, he left the back door open one morning and
was held up at gun point by three armed robbers. While trying to open the
safe, his hand, shaking from nervousness, slipped off the combination. The
robbers panicked and shot him. Luckily, Jerry was found relatively quickly
and rushed to the local trauma center. After 18 hours of surgery and weeks
of intensive care, Jerry was released from the hospital with fragments of
the bullets still in his body.
I saw Jerry about six months after the accident. When I asked him how he
was, he said, “If I were any better, I’d be twins. Wanna see my scars?”
I declined to see his wounds but did ask him what had gone through his mind
as the robbery took place. “The first thing that went through my mind was
that I should have locked the back door,” Jerry replied. “Then, as I lay on
the floor, I remembered that I had two choices – I could choose to live, or
I could choose to die. I chose to live.”
“Weren’t you scared? Did you lose consciousness?” I asked.
Jerry continued, “The paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was
going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the emergency room and I saw
the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really scared.
In their eyes, I read, ‘He’s a dead man. ” I knew I needed to take action.”
“What did you do?” I asked.
“Well, there was a big, burly nurse shouting questions at me,” said Jerry.
“She asked if I was allergic to anything. ‘Yes,’ I replied. The doctors and
nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply. I took a deep breath and
yelled, ‘Bullets!’ Over their laughter, I told them, “I am choosing to live.
Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead.”
Jerry lived thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his
amazing attitude. I learned from him that every day we have the choice to
live fully. Attitude, after all, is everything.

Work like you don’t need the money.
Love like you’ve never been hurt.
Dance like nobody’s watching.

21 things to remember

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21 THINGS TO REMEMBER:

1. No one can ruin your day without YOUR permission.
2. Most people will be about as happy as they decide to be.
3. Others can stop you temporarily but only you can do it permanently.
4. Whatever you are willing to put up with is exactly what you will have.
5. Success stops when you do.
6. When your ship comes in…. make sure you are willing to unload it.
7. You will never “have it all together.”
8. Life is a journey…not a destination. Enjoy the trip!
9. The biggest lie on the planet: “When I get what I want I will be happy.”
10. The best way to escape your problem is to solve it.
11. I’ve learned that ultimately ‘takers’ lose and ‘givers’ win.
12. Life’s precious moments don’t have value unless they are shared.
13. If you don’t start it’s certain you won’t arrive.
14. We often fear the thing we want the most.
15. He or she who laughs……lasts.
16. Yesterday was the deadline for all complaints.
17. Look for opportunities…not guarantees.
18. Life is what’s coming….not what was.
19. Success is getting up one more time.
20. Now is the most interesting time of all.
21. When things go wrong…..don’t go with them.

A Lesson from the Geese

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A LESSON FROM THE GEESE

Each fall, when you see geese heading south for the winter, flying alone in a “V” formation, you might consider what science has discovered as to why they fly that way. As each bird flaps its wings, it creates an uplift for the bird immediately following. By flying in “V” formation, the whole flock adds 71% greater flying range than if each bird flew on its own.
People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going more quickly and easily because they are traveling on the thrust of each other.
When a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the drag and resistance of trying to go it alone, and quickly gets back into formation to take advantage of the lifting power of the bird in front. If we have as much sense as a goose, we will stay in formation with those who are headed the same way as we are.
When the head goose gets tired, it rotates back in the wing and another goose flies point. It is sensible to take turns doing demanding jobs with people or with geese flying south. Geese honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep up their speed.
What do we say when we honk from behind?
Finally, and this is most important, when a goose gets sick, or is wounded and falls out of formation, two other geese fall out with that one and follow it down to lend help and protection. They stay with the fallen goose until it is able to fly, or until it dies; only then do they launch out on their own, or with another formation to catch up with their group.
If we have the sense of a goose, we will stand by each other as they do!

“TEAMWORK IS THE ABILITY TO WORK TOGETHER TOWARD A COMMON VISION.
THE ABILITY TO DIRECT INDIVIDUAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS TOWARD ORGANIZATIONAL
OBJECTIVES. IT IS THE FUEL THAT ALLOWS UNCOMMON PEOPLE TO ATTAIN
UNCOMMON RESULTS”.

Attributes of a Leader

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ATTRIBUTES OF A LEADER
“AN ARMY OF SHEEP LED BY A LION, WOULD DEFEAT AN ARMY OF LIONS LED BY A SHEEP.” An OLD ARAB PROVERB
What are the actions and attributes of a leader?
What is it that makes him different from others?

1. A leader is always full of praise.
2. A leader learns to use the phrases “thank you ” and “please” on his way to the top.
3. A leader is always growing.
4. A leader is possessed with his dreams.
5. A leader launches forth before success is certain.
6. A leader is not afraid of confrontation.
7. A leader talks about his own mistakes before talking about someone else’s.
8. A leader is a person of honesty and integrity.
9. A leader has a good name.
10. A leader makes others better.
11. A leader is quick to praise and encourage the smallest amount of improvement.
12. A leader is genuinely interested in others.
13. A leader looks for opportunities to find someone doing something right.
14. A leader takes others up with him.
15. A leader responds to his own failures and acknowledges them before others have to discover and reveal them;
16. A leader never allows murmuring – from himself or others.
17. A leader is specific in what he expects.
18. A leader holds accountable those who work with him.
19. A leader does what is right rather than what is popular.
20. A leader is a servant.
I’d rather see a sermon than hear one any day,
I’d rather one would walk with me than merely point the way;
For the eye is a better pupil and more willing than the ear,
Fine counsel is confusing but example is always clear.

And the best of all the preachers are the ones that live their creed,
For to see the good in action is what everybody needs.
I can soon learn how to do it if you let me see it done;
I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may run.

And the lectures you deliver may be very wise and true,
But I’d rather get my lessons from observing what you do.
For I may misunderstand the high advice you give,
There is no misunderstanding how you act and how you live.
Edgar Guest

My Favorite Maxims

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MY FAVORITE MAXIMS
By John Wooden

Happiness begins where selfishness ends.

The best way to improve the team is to improve ourself.

Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

I will get ready and then, perhaps, my chance will come.

If I am through learning, I am through.

If you do not have the time to do it right, when will you find the time to do it over?

The man who is afraid to risk failure seldom has to face success.

Don’t let yesterday take up too much of today.

Time spent getting even would be better spent trying to get ahead.

It is what you learn after you know it all that counts.

Goals achieved with little effort are seldom worthwhile or lasting.

What is right is more important than who is right.

Tell the truth. That way you don’t have to remember a story.

Although there is no progress without change, not all change is progress.

If we magnified blessings as much as we magnify disappointments, we would all be much happier.

The worst thing you can do for those you love is the things they could and should do
for themselves. (Abraham Lincoln)

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life that no man can sincerely help another without helping himself. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

Do not permit what you cannot do to interfere with what you can do.

Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation. Character is what you really are;
reputation is merely what you are perceived to be.

Love is the greatest of all words in our language.

Much can be accomplished by teamwork when no one is concerned about who gets credit.

Never make excuses. Your friends don’t need them and your foes won’t believe them.

Be slow to criticize and quick to commend.

Be more concerned with what you can do for others than what others can do for you. You’ll be surprised at the results.
Don’t permit fear of failure to prevent effort.

We are all imperfect and will fail on occasions, but fear of failure is the greatest failure of all.

Being average means you are as close to the bottom as you are to the top.

The time to make friends is before you need them.

Nothing can give you greater joy than doing something for another.

You cannot live a perfect day without doing something for another without thought of something in return.

Do not mistake activity for achievement.

The more concerned we become over the things we can’t control, the less we will do with the things we can control
Forget favors given; remember those received.

Make each day your masterpiece.

Acquire peace of mind by making the effort to become the best of which you are capable.

How to establish rapport with your athletic child

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How to establish rapport with your athletic child

by Lloyd Percival

I have been asked to do a book about the role parents should or should not play in the careers of their athletic offspring. I began to research the subject in some detail because it has been my experience that the popular consensus or “expert” opinion sometimes is not as accurate as it appears.
First, I talked with the young athletes and found that though parents often present a problem, the youngsters appear anxious to solve it. They want their parents to be closely involved but without creating pressure and without causing either a super-critical or an over-protective environment.

Here are some golden rules,
1. Make sure that your child knows that – win or lose, scared or heroic – you love him, appreciate his efforts and are not disappointed in him. This will allow him to do his best, to avoid developing a fear of failure based on the spectre of disapproval and family disappointment if he does mess up. Be the person in his life he can look to for constant positive enforcement. Learn to hide your feelings if he disappoints you.

2. Try your best to be completely honest about your child’s athletic capability, his competitive attitude, his sportsmanship and his actual skill level.

3. Be helpful but don’t “coach” him on the way to the track, diamond or court…on the way back…at breakfast…and so on. Sure, it’s tough not to, but it’s a lot tougher for the child to be inundated with advice, pep talks and often critical instruction.

4. Teach him to enjoy the thrill of competition, to be “out there trying” to be working to improve his skills and attitudes…to take the physical bumps and come back for more. Don’t say “winning doesn’t count” because it does. Instead, help him develop the feel for competing, for trying hard, for having fun.

5. Try not to relive your athletic life through your child in a way that creates pressure; you fumbled too, you lost as well as won. You were frightened, you backed off at times, you were not always heroic. Don’t pressure him because of your pride. Sure, he is an extension of you, but let him make his own voyage of discovery into the world of sport…Let him sail into it without interference. Help to calm the water when things get stormy, but let him handle his own navigational problems.
Find out what he is all about and don’t assume he feels the way you did, wants the same things, has the same attitudes. You gave him life, now let him learn to handle it, enjoy it. Let him need you on his terms – don’t help him to death. Athletic children need their parents, so you must not withdraw. Just remember there is a thinking, feeling, sensitive, free spirit out there in that uniform who needs a lot of understanding, especially when his world turns bad on him. If he is comfortable with you – win or lose – he’s on his way to maximum achievement and enjoyment – and you will get your kicks too! In the meantime, start to think of your child as a child, not as “my son, the athlete!” If you do, the morale of the family will greatly improve.

6. Don’t compete with the coach. The young athlete often comes home and chatters on about “coach says this, coach says taht” ad nauseam. This, I realize, is often hard to take – especially for the father who has had some sports experience or for the mother if what the “coach says” refers to the youngster’s eating pattern.
When a certain degree of disenchantment about the coach sets in, some parents side with the youngster and are happy to see him shot down. This is a mistake. It should provide a chance to discuss (not lecture) with the youngster the importance of learning how to handle problems, react to criticism and understand the necessity for discipline, rules, regulations and so on.

7. Don’t compare the skill, courage or attitudes of your child with that of other members of the squad or team, at least in his hearing. And if your child shows a tendency to resent the treatment he gets from the coach, or the approval other team members get, be careful to talk over the facts quietly and try to provide fair and honest counsel. If you play the role of the overly-protective parent who is blinded to the relative merits of your youngster and his actual status as an athlete and individual, you will merely perpetuate the problem. Your youngster could become a problem athlete.

8. You should also get to know the coach so that you can be assured that his philosophy, attitudes, ethics and knowledge are such that you are happy to expose your child to him. The coach has a tremendous potential influence.

9. Always remember that children tend to exaggerate, both when praised and when criticized. Temper your reactions to the tales of woe or heroics they bring home. Don’t cut your youngster down if you feel he is exaggerating – just take a look at the situation and gradually try to develop an even level. Above all, don’t over-react and rush off to the coach if you feel an injustice has been done. Investigate, but anticipate that the problem is not as it might appear.

10. Make a point of understanding courage, and the fact that is relative. There are different kinds of courage. Some of us can climb mountains, but are frightened to get into a fight. Others can fight without fear but turn to jelly if a bee approaches. Everyone is frightened in certain areas – nobody escapes fear and that is just as well since it often helps us avoid disaster.
Explain to your youngster that courage does not mean an absence of fear but rather means doing something in spite of fear or discomfort. In a way, the parents are the primary coaches. I have talked with many great athletes who, in evaluating the reasons for their success, have said: “My parents really helped. I was lucky in this respect.”
To me the coaching job the parent has is the toughest one of all and it takes a lot of effort to do it well. It is worth all the effort when you hear your youngster boast (now or later on) that you played a key role in his success.

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